eye of the cyclone

is there life on earth, or are we just dreaming…

  • USING THIS SITE

    SEARCH BOX: If a search engine brought you here, but you can't see what you are looking for, or if you want to find other entries with the same (or differerent) 'key words' try the SEARCH BOX! or check out the ALL POSTS! button in the MENU BAR at the top of the page

Adelaide Homeless Wars

Posted by lahar9jhadav on April 9, 2008

 

original source here

(used without permission)

cardboard shelter inner city Adelaide

 

 

Homeless Wars

Norm Barber
Adelaide, South Australia

 

 

“There’s no such thing as client self-determination.”
Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home

“We get people housing,” a bulky, fiftyish woman tells me at a Homeless Health Day in Adelaide’s Whitmore Square, her Street-to-home identification card hidden inside her shirt.

“Where are the houses,” I ask. She laughs jocularly.

Two others at her table slide away taking positions behind me.

“We help people in other ways,” she counters, her eyes narrowing, pupils now tiny pinpricks of grey fury. She admits to being a “mental health worker” then nods curtly when I suggest, “psychiatric nurse”?

“Are you homeless?” she asks, accusingly.

Street-to-Home scours the Adelaide CBD parklands with social worker/ nurse teams, searching for homeless people. The initial “hook” upon discovery may be a friendly greeting followed with lunch at a café, or an offer of a blanket, or parcel of food pushed into a culvert refuge-plus they want name and date-of-birth. They observe responses; listen for strange ideas- does the person mutter to his or herself; they discreetly sniff for odour. They may also take a photograph making the person easier to track down later.

Monsignor Cappo, a Catholic Vicar and State Commissioner for Social Inclusion, based in the Department of Premier and Cabinet, controls Street-to-home. He explains:

“When we identify a homeless person, the social workers will stay with that person, work with them and not let go of that relationship until they are housed.”1

The process may take a dozen encounters until the team collects enough evidence to recommend psychiatric treatment to the homeless person. If refused the team phones an on-call GP or psychiatrist who issues a three-day detention order. Police use force if the person refuses to go by ambulance to Glenside Psychiatric Hospital. Further detention orders depend on whether the person acts ‘normal’ inside the ward.2

One might imagine the difficulty of acting normal for someone living years outside then suddenly locked in a mental ward, thus a further three-week treatment order is nearly unavoidable. The legislated appeal provisions against detention orders are effectively voided due to the slowness of the legal process and the difficulty a medicated person faces in providing a legal defense.

Release from hospital is often subject to continuing treatment orders based on the ex-homeless patients’ inability to look after themselves, often true because psychiatric sedation makes walking difficult let alone outdoor survival.

Street-to-home then contacts Centrelink who provide income and asset details, without seeking client permission, then gets the Guardianship Board to authorise the Public Trustee to take 80% of the person’s welfare income, or withdraw money from their savings, and give it to a Supported Residential Facility.3

These private business boarding houses occasionally offer single occupancy rooms but often have just share accommodation so the ex-homeless person, having lived outside for years, is suddenly sleeping two-metres from a stranger. There is rarely anywhere to lock up valuables and personal items are stolen or destroyed by other residents in rages triggered by psychiatric drug inbalances or psychotic attacks.

Street-to-home sent one homeless person to Palm Lodge where residents show newcomers where the suicide happened; the scene of the suspicious fatal throat slashing; old bloodstains.4

When Street-to-home say “home” it may mean “mental home”.

Adelaide artist Daniel Kean said that in his Norwood Supported Residential Facility suicide attempts and/or bloody self-mutilation is a weekly occurrence.

Escape is difficult if the Public Trustee legally gives the ex-homeless person’s welfare money to the boarding house operator who doles out tiny amounts daily, along with pills, as if the person is a child. The pills themselves are problematic causing brown and crumbling teeth that further stigmatise the ex-homeless person.

Observational evidence of people staying in Adelaide boarding houses, where some of the parklands homeless are sent, is that one-quarter are diabetics. Diabetes is a primary side-effect from anti-psychotic drugs like Olanzapine and Clozapine.5 Eyesight deterioration, heart and kidney trouble and wounds that don’t heal are inevitable consequences of diabetes. Symptoms can be reduced through discontinuing the drugs but this is rarely a medical priority.

Symptoms are exacerbated because boarding houses invariably serve cheap, fatty, sugary meals.

“It’s a business thing,” one employee told me, “The owners don’t really care about the people.”6

Nor can the ex-homeless person buy better food because the boarding house absorbs most of his or her money. Savings from living outside quickly become exhausted and the impetus to return to nature strengthens.

“He surprised me,” the same employee said about one ex-homeless tenant, “when he announced:” ‘I’m going to live outside and save some money.’

Some anti-psychotic medications cause brain damage with symptoms similar to carbon monoxide poisoning plus shuffling gait, wild tremors, protruding tongue, blotchy purple skin, lips oozing mucous and skin lesions on hands.7

Ceasing anti-depressant use is also problematic triggering paranoid delusions and hallucinations, themselves symptoms of mental illness, so in the confusion the patient becomes a lifetime regular on the drug merry-to-round.

One nurse at an Adelaide homeless centre says people become “drug messes” while patients themselves talk about “drug holidays” where they challenge medical authority and stop using all drugs. A worker serving free meals from a food van told me one woman was homeless because she was escaping a psychiatric drug treatment order.

When an ex-homeless patient stops using the pills, or doesn’t turn up for an injection, then the Mobile Assertive Care Team pays a visit. One employee told me his job was banging on doors demanding to see people swallowing their pills. Refusal means a second visit that may include a loaded syringe.

This treatment regime is for people who weren’t necessarily causing a disturbance but were camping in the Adelaide parklands and sought out by Street-to-home.

Another stage for ex-homeless humans is Case Management. MACHA is the Multi-Agency Community Housing Association with two hundred government-owned properties reserved for people having lived extended periods outside.

Macha requires prospective tenants to sign Case Management agreements with other agencies to get on its lengthy waiting list. Matthew Woodward, MACHA CEO, told me that once a person becomes a tenant there isn’t any requirement for further Case Management. Yet many are “Case Managed” and then further “encouraged” to accept volunteers into their homes. Jay Weatherill, Minister for Housing explains: “…people will then be matched with Red Cross volunteers who will offer clients one-on-one support, seven days a week.”8

This “support” means friendly visits where volunteers obtain intimate details of the tenant’s life that, despite the best intentions of the volunteers, may be shared amongst various government and non-government agencies, and used later to control the clients’ lives.9,10 Red Cross has strict information sharing protocols but volunteers may still become the unwitting eye of the landlord, police, psychiatrist, Centrelink and Street-to-home, etc, all in one. 11

Some people thrive from this attention while others experience it as lifestyle or house arrest where one becomes a de facto ward of the state with an uncertain release date.

Greg Calder, former regional manager of the Assertive Crisis Intervention Service (ACIS), a psychiatric apprehension agency, is now manager of Street-to-home. He casts doubt whether ex-homeless people, once under control of Street-to-home, will ever be completely free.

Assertive team case management is utilised by Street to Home staff to maintain continuity of support to the client. Support is provided until the client is stabilised in long-term accommodation, or an alternative lead agency has assumed a primary case-management/support role. Withdrawal of Street to Home Service occurs in a graduated manner, with clearly identified processes for service re-engagement, if required.12

Street-to-home wouldn’t tell me their address and misdirected me to Sefton Park, a middle Adelaide suburb where I visited two government clinics at random. By chance medical documents awaiting courier pickup for Street-to-home lay on the front counter and showed its address:

15 Bentham Street, Adelaide.13

A big sign indicating, “MoneyBags.com.au” greets the visitor entering Street-to-home’s building. MoneyBags run get-rich-quick property investment courses. The tenant directory board doesn’t include Street-to-Home but the lack of a 1st floor listing is a dead giveaway.

I take the elevator that opens into a tiny reception area without seats or decorations except a sign urging employees to keep doors locked. A Canadian-accented receptionist sits behind a sealed security window. I announce I’m here because Street-to-home emailed me saying the manager, Greg Calder “…is happy for you to call him…” to discuss an interview, but they’re less than overjoyed at my appearance.

The stricken receptionist backs away from the shatterproof glass as I introduce myself. She returns with two women, one with dilated pupils who bends over exposing her golden brown breasts whereupon I smile until cut short by the icy stares of the other two women. I blink nervously and she turns around apparently tying up her shoes. With her head near her knees she says the manager is in a meeting but will contact me.

He eventually does saying the condition of any interview is that their “media people” read anything before it goes to print, followed by a second message saying he will consider questions by email only and that, “…there will not be the need to meet.” I react somewhat emotionally, firing off an immediate reply: ” I don’t allow vetting or censorship of my writing…You aren’t laying down special rules for an ex-homeless person are you?” Greg Calder responds by calling John Hancock, the Department of Health PR guy, who arranges a call to Big Issue magazine, where I’m a columnist.14 He tells Martin Hughes, the Editor that I’d been “threatening” and “intimidating”. Similar information is sent to the Social Inclusion Commission,15 listed in Big Issue Magazine as a Major Sponsor. The Editor is concerned, to say the least.

Street-to-home staff are paranoid about keeping their own address secret and barricade their office as if expecting attack. Greg Calder wrote: “…one client did come to the previous office and behaved violently towards clerical staff,” but he refused further details.16 This doesn’t blend well into images of appreciative clients plucked from the scourge of homelessness now enjoying the enriched lifestyle of being housed and supported by numerous agencies.

Street-to-home bases itself in a building housing a property investment outfit, and land brokers. It’s also named and modeled after Rosanne Haggerty’s Street-to-home organisation in New York where she works as a real estate agent. Rosanne was a South Australian government Thinker-in-residence. Street-to-home in New York City has a free phone number to dob in homeless people.17

Adelaide’s CBD population is expected to increase from 19,286 in 2001 to 33,796 in 2016 with foreign students and richer people moving in whilst homeless underclass citizens head out.18

The difficulty with shifting parklands eccentrics is that replacing cheap rooming houses with expensive apartments doesn’t affect them because they live outside permanently. Nor are the CBD church community centres abandoning them and continue to provide food, water and daytime shelter.

The government has responded with psychiatry: veteran rough sleepers voluntarily leave the parklands or, if they don’t agree, involuntarily enter Glenside Psychiatric Hospital.

“Dave” is a dignified older man who spent nights collecting drink cans with his shopping trolley. You could find him resting on seats outside the walls of Government House. Sarah Smith and Andrew Grant of Street-to-home found him walking down Rundle Street. They took his photo, plonked him into Glenside Hospital then produced, with the help of a Department of Health spin doctor, a magazine article, stating next to his photo, that he was acutely psychotic.19,20

After Glenside they shifted him to Mile End, where he was last seen still pushing his trolley though no longer reducing CBD property values by his presence.

Street-to-home said that at the end of 2005 they’d “housed” twenty homeless people. Their annual budget exceeds a million dollars, none of which was used for housing but spent chasing up twenty people who didn’t necessarily want to be “housed”. Yet over a hundred live outside in the CBD, most eager for housing, and despite such expenditure housing availability for homeless people in the Adelaide CBD hasn’t improved. “It’s certainly harder to get people accommodation than when I started five years ago,” says one support caseworker.21

Street-to-home’s core activity is the building of dossiers on every person they encounter living outside. This follows real estate agent Rosanne Haggerty’s recommendation to the government:

“South Australia should create a registry of those considered to be ‘primary homeless’…This would likely be done by reviewing each ‘systems’ data (health, mental health, corrections) and in collaboration with the not-for-profit service providers…” 22

Adelaide Street-to-home seeks initially full name and date-of-birth. From this they attempt to access personal records from hospitals, Housing Trust, police, Salvation Army, Centrelink, Aboriginal clinics and agencies, participating church-based homeless agencies and the Brian Burdekin Clinic. They exploit the concept of “implied consent” where government departments and homeless organisations may share client details without seeking permission. It’s often done informally leaving minimal paper or electronic trails.23,24,25

However, the situation is unclear and not everyone agrees with Ms Haggerty’s recommendations. The Housing Trust says they:

“…would not release a customer’s personal information to Street-to-home without a written authority from the customer expressly agreeing to such a release.” Centrelink defines “express authority” as meaning the customer is contacted and asked to allow information release. Clients of both the Trust and Centrelink can, theoretically, have special blocks put on their files to prevent release of personal details without “express authority”. However, the Housing Trust is working on a ‘Memorandum of Understanding’ with the Mental Health Services which includes Street-to-home.26,27

Monsignor State Commissioner Cappo wants less privacy, saying: “I’m still dealing with some significant groups of bureaucrats who still are resistant to change…there are still people…the resistance I’ve had…is resistance that I, I will not accept and I won’t tolerate…”28

One office worker from an agency not receiving Social Inclusion Initiative money told me at a homeless Christmas Party that personal information given by clients was not shared outside his organisation. “What about psychiatric enquiries,” I asked. “That’s a grey area,” he replied, momentarily avoiding eye contact.

Street-to-home has special access because while pursuing the social goal of stopping people living outside in the parklands, they are within the Department of Health. This gives them access to confidential personal details through the guise of medical personnel and implied consent, thus they operate under the privacy protection radar, so to speak.

Using a psychiatric outfit like Street-to-home to build and administer a register of “homeless” in the city equates living outside with mental illness with all its corresponding attitudes and treatments. This register under construction merges confidential personal information from other government departments and church agencies. It makes it easier for them to track down individuals by discovering new addresses, vulnerabilities and by default turn off physical necessities.

And while they’re grabbing others’ private details they’re not giving anything away about themselves. Rob Pegram, Executive Director of the Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, which controls a number of South Australia’s government hospitals and clinics, has ordered that no further information be provided to myself.29 Carmel Zollo, Minister for Mental Health declined to override this order as did her successor Gail Gago.

Street-to-home’s actual role is to impose psychiatric detention orders and to compile a central register of those living outside. It’s role as a housing organisation is pretense, just a front. Another agency worker told me Street-to-home maintains this front by claiming someone as their client, waits for another agency to find accommodation, then claims they, Street-to-home, found the housing. “Street-to-home is the biggest joke,” she says. “They’re a statistics machine. They ring us up and use our statistics.”30

One man aged fifty-five told me he phoned Street-to-home: “We talked seventeen minutes. They asked me if I smoked dope,” he exclaims, disgusted. “I said no so they don’t want to know me. I’ve been sitting on the street for three months.”

It is difficult not to conclude that Street-to-home uses the threat of psychiatry to expel eccentrics living in the Adelaide parklands. This suits the property developers and richer folk living nearby. Strange men dressed in odd clothing and collecting cans from rubbish bins are not wanted. This explains why the government hired a real estate agent as Thinker in Residence.

The initial remedy for “homelessness” should be safe shelter whether a tent, shed, pergola, or conventional housing and without breaking up the church-based and peer group network that has supported those camping outside in Adelaide for a hundred years. It is a lack of safe shelter that often causes depression, anxiety and exhaustion, not always the other way around.

When assessing what the state government is trying to achieve one might note the following statement from Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home: “There’s no such thing as client self-determination.” 31

This is the homeless war raging quietly behind the building boom and population growth of the City of Adelaide and its surrounding parklands.

End Notes

1. The Advertiser Newspaper. “Minister’s Vow: We’ll help those sleeping rough” by Jemma Chapman. 12 August 2005. Also at www.propertytalk.com/content/view/723/6/ and www.knowledgeplex.org/news/108386.html both accessed 15 April 2006

2. Mental Health Act 1993 (incorporating amendments to 24 November 2003). Government of South Australia. Carmel Zollo, then Minister for Mental health and Substance Abuse referred me to Margret Scheil, Assistant Director of Safety and Quality at Glenside Psychiatric Hospital to have explained the specific procedures for detaining homeless people. Ms Scheil became agitated when questioned saying she didn’t want to “spy” on her colleagues. I asked Ms Zollo to supply someone who would talk but she failed to respond as did her successor after the 2006 election, Gail Gago.

3. Kosiak, Mary. Area Director, Centrelink, GPO Box 481, Adelaide, 5001 in a letter to the author dated 17 February 2006.

4. Media Release from Government of South Australia, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, dated 5 January 2006. The unsigned document was in response to questions directed by myself to Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home. John Hancock, public relations officer for the Dept of Health, forwarded the reply to myself. Hancock won’t identify the author though it appears to be the work of Greg Calder.

5. Haddad, Peter, M; Dursun, Serdar and Deakin, Bill, editors. Adverse syndromes and psychiatric drugs: A clinical guide; Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom. 2004

6. The informant has worked in numerous government subsidised private boarding houses for psychiatric patients, officially called Supported Residential Facilities (SRF).

7. Haddad, Peter, M; Dursun, Serdar and Deakin, Bill, editors. Adverse syndromes and psychiatric drugs: A clinical guide; Oxford University Press, Oxford, United Kingdom. 2004

 

 

8. Weatherill, Jay. Minister for Housing, Government of South Australia. “Practical Support To Tackle Homelessness” – Media Release: Wednesday, 19 October, 2005 www.families.sa.gov.au/Default.aspx?tabid=53&mid=460&ctl=ViewDe
tails&ItemID=216&PageIndex=0

9. Media Release from Government of South Australia, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, dated 5 January 2006. The unsigned document was in response to questions directed to Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home. John Hancock, public relations officer for the Dept of Health forwarded the reply to myself. Hancock won’t identify the author though it appears to be the work of Greg Calder. From the media release:

“STH [Street-to-home] has strong links with all inner city non government agencies, key SA Government agencies and Centrelink. This includes links with SAHT, Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol SA, Nunkuwarrin Yunti, RDNS, Aboriginal Sobriety Group, SA Police, Adelaide City Council, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Brian Burdekin Clinic, Hutt Street Centre, Baptist Community Services Salvation Army and St Vincent de Paul.”

10. Kosiak, Mary. Area Director, Centrelink, GPO Box 481, Adelaide, 5001. Letter to the author dated 17 February 2006.

11. Macha tenants are required to sign an agreement with Red Cross before volunteers make visits where the tenant allows Red Cross to pass on personal information to other specified agencies including Macha. The crucial factor is what these other agencies do with personal details. Macha CEO Matthew Woodward has not made himself available for questioning on this matter.

12. Calder, Greg. Manager, Street-to-home. Email to the author dated 4 Nov 2005

13. “We’re local,” Amy, Street-to-home telephone receptionist said when asked what government department they were within. “We’re in Sefton Park” she replied when asked, “Where are you located?” I visited government clinics in this middle Adelaide suburb including Community Health Enfield, 5/221 Main North Road, Sefton Park, which is part of Adelaide Central Community Health Service. An employee was mystified when I mentioned the secrecy and deception.”We’re open about our services. We don’t have anything to hide,” she said and phoned Street-to-home, speaking to Andrew Grant. “He’s very guarded,” she said after hanging up and with an uneasy look on her face. A courier bag full of medical documents rested on the counter and was labeled: Street-to-home, 15 Bentham St., Adelaide.

14. This was from March 2004 to March 2006.

15. The Social Inclusion Unit was rebadged the Social Inclusion Commission in April 2006 when its Chair, David Cappo, received the new title of State Commissioner for Social Inclusion. I’ve used the latest terms throughout for ease of reading.

16. Media Release from Government of South Australia, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, dated 5 January 2006. The unsigned document was in response to questions directed to Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home. John Hancock, public relations officer for the Dept of Health forwarded the response to myself. Hancock won’t identify the author though it appears to be the work of Greg Calder. Calder wouldn’t explain what form the “violence” took and what happened to the “client”

17. Website: http://www.commonground.org/S2Hi/ Accessed 6 April 2006.

18. City of Adelaide. “Site Capacity for Residential and Commercial Growth in the City of Adelaide”: Final Report”. Prepared for the City of Adelaide, September 2003.

19. In Touch Magazine. “Nurses help Adelaide’s homeless make a new start.” Published by Australian Nursing Federation (South Australian Branch), 18 Dequetteville Terrace, Kent Town SA 5067. October 2005.

20. Media Release from Government of South Australia, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, dated 5 January 2006. The unsigned document was in response to questions directed to Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home. John Hancock, public relations officer for the Dept of Health, forwarded it to myself. Hancock won’t identify the author though it appears to be the work of Greg Calder.

I had asked whether “Dave”, as he is known on the streets of Adelaide, had given informed consent to having his picture and story put in the “In Touch” nurses magazine. The response was:

“As with all publications by STH privacy and dignity of the individual was at the forefront. All the information printed in the article for “SA Nurses’ In Touch” magazine was published with consent of the other man, and he had read the article prior to publication.” And when asked if the Street-to-home staff would allow their pictures in this publication the response was: “I have enquired with staff members and they have indicated they do not wish to be photographed.”

21. Recorded interview, March 2006. Welfare staff wish not to be identified for fear of reprisals. This was a familiar refrain from government funded non-profit organisations. One elderly worker ran from me upon hearing the words, “Social Inclusion”. He hid behind a glass window and pointed to a “street worker” who said they were afraid of losing funding if they spoke to me.

22. Haggerty, Rosanne. “Ending Homelessness in South Australia.” Department of Premier and Cabinet, Government of South Australia. Adelaide, South Australia. 2005 page 11

23. Media Release from Government of South Australia, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, dated 5 January 2006. The unsigned document was in response to questions directed to Greg Calder, Manager of Street-to-home. John Hancock, public relations officer for the Dept of Health, forwarded it to myself. Hancock won’t identify the author though it appears to be the work of Greg Calder. It stated:

“STH [Street-to-Home] has strong links with all inner city non government agencies, key SA Government agencies and Centrelink. This includes links with SAHT, Mental Health, Drug and Alcohol SA, Nunkuwarrin Yunti, RDNS, Aboriginal Sobriety Group, SA Police, Adelaide City Council, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Brian Burdekin Clinic, Hutt Street Centre, Baptist Community Services, Salvation Army and St Vincent de Paul.”

Dr Damian Mead of the Brian Burdekin Clinic wrote in a letter to the author dated 27 March 2006, in response to reading the above paragraph: “It is a policy of the Brian Burdekin Clinic that no information regarding any client is disclosed to any other party, agency or individual without the consent of the client.”

The Adelaide Day Centre, also known as the Moore Street Day Centre say they are out of this information sharing loop as they don’t accept government funding (except cheap building rent from the South Australian Housing Trust). Sister Joyce Vandersman says they record client first names only.

24. Kosiak, Mary. Area Director, Centrelink, GPO Box 481, Adelaide, 5001 in a letter to the author dated 17 February, 2006. Ms Kosiak says Centrelink will disclose only information relevant to the person or agency seeking it. E.g. they’ll give payment details to a housing association, but not much else. However, the fact that Ms Kosiak, in such a senior position, thinks Street-to-home is a “community organisation dealing with emergency housing,” doesn’t bode well for a homeless person’s privacy.

25. Smith, Peter. Deputy Chief Executive, Dept for Families and Communities, Riverside Building, North Terrace, Adelaide, in a letter to the author dated 21 March, 2006. Mr Smith says the South Australian Housing Trust will disclose customer’s personal details, (including past customers), to “third parties…where the Housing Trust believe they have a duty of care to a customer who may be at risk of harm to themselves or others.” This works informally presently and the Trust is preparing to formalise it in a “Memorandum of Understanding”. However, if one is not at risk of harm to oneself or others he says, in a second letter dated 10 April 2006: “Indeed the Housing Trust would not release a customer’s personal information to Street-to-home without a written authority from the customer expressly agreeing to such a release.” It comes down to who decides the mental state of the client and is the decision-maker and the person seeking the information one and the same.

26. Smith, Peter. Deputy Chief Executive, Dept for Families and Communities, Riverside Building, North Terrace, Adelaide, in a letter to the author dated 10 April 2006.

27. Kosiak, Mary. Area Director, Centrelink, GPO Box 481, Adelaide, 5001 in a letter to the author dated 11 April 2006. Ms Kosiak says those wishing to “restrict release of information under implied authority” should contact the Call Centre or visit a Centrelink office.

28. Cappo, David interviewed on ABC radio 5AN 891 by Matthew Abraham and David Bevan. 28 April 2006.

29. Pegram Rob, Executive Director, Primary Health Care Services, Central Northern Adelaide Health Service, 207-255 Hampstead Road, Northfield, SA 5085 in a letter dated 12 January 2006. Carmel Zollo, Minister for Mental Health and Substance Abuse declined to rescind this directive as did her successor Gail Gago.

30. Over an 18-month period I questioned two dozen welfare professionals and government bureaucrats formally and informally, usually on the condition they remained anonymous.

31. It is Calder’s statement: “There’s no such thing as client self-determination,” made to a number of welfare workers, that perhaps sums up Street-to-home policy most accurately.

________________

Norm Barber is a long time Adelaide Author -he has published many books including:

HOW TO BECOME A SUCCESSFUL DERELICT IN ADELAIDE (1987)

HOW TO HAVE A SUCCESSFUL NERVOUS BREAKDOWN IN ADELAIDE (1988)

DISAPPEARING CHARITY DONATIONS IN ADELAIDE (1991)

HOW TO BECOME A SUCCESSFUL HEALER IN ADELAIDE – starting with yourself (1992)

all written with insight, compassion and intelligence.

see also The Nasty Side Of Organ Transplanting

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s